Iris City Chiropractic Center, P.C.

Robert A. Hayden, D.C., PhD, F.I.C.C. (770) 412-0005

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Office Hours

Clinic Hours: 8:30 AM until the needs of our last patient for the day have been met. We take lunch from about 12:30 till 2 o'clock.
Drug screens: 9:00-3:00pm Monday - Thursday and 9:00-2:00pm on Friday for drug screen collections.
Physicals:  We do physicals (DOT, pre-employment) during the same hours the clinic is open, but call to be sure Dr. Hayden is in clinic when you need your exam done.

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Welcome

Bob Hayden_2office exterior_2The Iris City Chiropractic Center was founded on 23 October 95 by Robert A. Hayden, DC, PhD. While primarily a chiropractic clinic, the center also offers massage therapy, custom orthotics, and bone density testing. The occupational health portion of the practice serves many employers with DOT and pre-employment physicals, a full range of drug and alcohol testing, and random drug testing to facilitate compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace initiative of the Chamber of Commerce.

Dr. Hayden began work in health care as a Cardiovascular Clinical Nurse Specialist, but also was an Executive Director of a state association, continuing education consultant, and registered lobbyist while in professional nursing. He earned a PhD from the University of Mississippi while enrolled at Life University, from which he graduated in 1995. He specializes in Cox Flexion Distraction/Disc Decompression technique.

riskDr. Hayden is an active member of the American Chiropractic Association. He serves as a member of the Media Team, through which he is a spokesman for the Association to television, radio, and printed media.

Dr. Hayden is the immediate past president of the Georgia Chiropractic Association. He is a current member of the Executive Committee and was recognized as the 2006-2007 Chiropractor of the Year. He was inducted in 2009 as a Fellow of the International College of Chiropractic, which is the highest international honor the chiropractic profession has to offer.

In February, 2012, he was honored with a Presidential Leadership Award by Dr. Keith Overland, President of the American Chiropractic Association, for his work as the ACA Delegate from Georgia.

Educational News Blog

We recommend educating yourself as much as possible about your health and wellness. Here are a few articles written by Robert A. Hayden, DC, PhD, FICC. But by all means continue your education beyond what you find here.

Leaf Well Enough Alone

Robert A. Hayden, DC, PhD, FICC

Climate change is real, and it is already upon us. We call it “Fall,” of course, the first day of which has officially happened. Since it is still near 90 degrees outside, you may not have noticed.

Soon, however, actual climate change will be here indeed with cooler, crispy morning air. The leaves will turn exciting colors and begin to fall in larger numbers. Christmas items will appear in many stores before October is here. And, of course, Alabama will remain undefeated. These are signs that Fall has come around again.

As leaves cover and decorate our lawns, many of us will feel honor-bound to do something about it. I once gave this some serious thought as leaves covered our own grass at home. My thinking encompassed some theology as well as botany. It went like this: only God can make a tree; trees make leaves; leaves are jettisoned by the trees when the time is right. Gravity and wind, also under control of an omnipotent God, determine the ultimate placement of those leaves.   Thus, God Himself put those leaves on the ground. And who am I to thwart His purpose?

Read more ...

Gray Hair in Medicine: Declining Doctors

Robert Hayden, DC, PhD, FICC

You may have heard the expression, “Choose your doctors young, and your lawyers older.” I think that means that medical knowledge was (hopefully) continuously advancing, so doctors less distant from graduation would be more in tune with the latest thinking. Law, on the other hand, would (hopefully) be more stable, so a wizened and wily barrister would be just fine, and maybe preferable if you are a defendant.

That may still be good advice, but now more difficult to achieve. The Journal of the American Medical Association Surgery (JAMA-Surgery) this week reports that the number of physicians practicing in the United States since 1975 who are over 65 years of age has risen 374%.   That may sound like there are more physicians than there were in 1975, but what it really means is that the ones still here are much older. In fact, this study tells us that 23% of practicing physicians now are over 65 years of age.  

Many folks assume that age 65 is the beginning of the golden age of retirement. Baron von Bismark established the age of 70 for the Social Security System in Germany in 1881 as a way to woo the working class away from the rising socialist party and Karl Marx. However, our Social Security administration says that the retirement age here in the States was not based on the German model, but on actuarial studies indicating that by using age 65 as the starting point, a manageable, self-sustaining system could be built with “modest” taxation.   However you look at it, the age 65 seems arbitrary for retirement.

Read more ...

The Answer, My Friend, Is Blowin’ in the Wind

Robert A. Hayden, DC, PhD, FICC

That title is not original with me. You may recognize it from Bob Dylan’s song of 1962. Originally penned as a war protest piece, it asks searching questions about why things happen.

Events of the past few days will provoke many of us to ask the questions again. Irma wrecked many of our homes, neighborhoods, and businesses. This phenomenon of weather has cost us time, money, and irreplaceable “stuff” that we treasured. I could not help feeling like our beautiful town was wrecked as I walked or drove in Third Ward, on College Street, Maple Street, Hill Street, and others. It was more than sad. This is our town.

One estimate suggested that Irma will cost between $62-$94 billion, and that coupled with Harvey, her older brother, the cost should hit $150-$200 billion. That is as bad as Katrina, a recent horror whose effects linger still that set the economy back $160 billion.

We feel the anxiety building when we see the weather forecast, and then the news reports of what is happening in Florida. We know it’s coming our way. We who were here remember Opal here in Griffin in 1995.

Read more ...

Stroke of Luck: Prevention of a Vertebrobasilar Vascular Event

By Robert A. Hayden, D.C., Ph.D., FICC

There has been much written about vertebral artery stroke risk and chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT). VAS has a mortality exceeding 85 percent, and the survivors typi- cally experience dysfunction in multiple body systems due to involvement of the brainstem and cerebellum, so hemi- or quadriplegia, ataxia, dysphagia, dysarthria, visual distur- bances, and cranial neuropathies are possible(1). Making the diagnosis based on clinical presentation may be challenging due to the variability of manifestations.

The Cassidy study was the largest and most comprehen- sive on the issue of VAS. The focus was on 818 VAS events that appeared in over 100 million person-years. The authors found that people who experienced VAS were no more likely to have seen a chiropractor than they were to have seen their primary care provider (PCP). They concluded that VAS is
a rare event, and that CMT offered no excess risk. Further, the Cassidy study suggests that risk of VAS associated with CMT and PCP visits are most likely because many VAS patients present with neck pain and headaches(2).

The physical presentation is variable, but complicating the early recognition of VAS is the lack of any de nitive or reliable orthopedic or vascular physical exam procedure to herald its presence(3). Signs and symptoms must be interpret- ed in the context of a patient’s total medical history, after which appropriate imaging may be considered(4).

Read more ...

10 Surprising Things Muscle Spasms Reveal About Your Health

Though the occasional spasm—an involuntary contraction of the muscle—is totally normal and nothing to get bent out of shape about, a persistent one can hint at an underlying condition. Here's what's going on, and when to seek a doctor's help.

From Reader's Digest

You worked yourself too hard

Your muscles can only do so much before they say, nope, you've gone too far. Though there are often good DIY remedies for muscle pain relief, sometimes you need something more. Muscle spasms, whether in your back, leg, or neck, can be from a muscle that's overworked while doing strenuous or repetitive movements like gardening, cleaning, or holding a baby. "Muscles get fatigued and sore and you'll experience a spasm," says Robert Hayden, DC, PhD, founder of Iris City Chiropractic Center in Griffin, Georgia. He often uses a treatment called electrotherapy in his office to "break the cycle of spasms" in a 15- to 20-minute session.

Read the rest at https://www.rd.com/health/conditions/what-muscle-spasms-reveal-about-your-health/ 

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